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>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
but not u.s. a top qaddafi insider who defected and his connection to pan am flight 103. i'm erica hill. also tonight, milk in the u.s. now showing traces of radiation from japan. what authorities are doing to keep you safe. why did plants that bury nuclear waste inside nevada's yucca mountain get killed? was it safety fears or politics? and the sweet taste of success. they owe their lottery jackpot to a candy bar. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. muammar qaddafi's inner circle continues to shrink. first, his foreign minister defected last night. and then today, his u.n. ambassador quit while in egypt. just the same, qaddafi's military, though decimated by allied air strikes, is still pounding rebel forces. driving them further east away from key oil towns. one rebel leader compared qaddafi to a wounded animal, one that's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin b
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: there may be no american troops on the ground, but c.i.a. officers are operating inside libya. among other things, they picked up a member of the air crew of that american jet which crashed last week. their primary goal is to find out who the rebels are and what they need, but defense secretary gates today threw cold water on the idea that the u.s. is about to start arming or training the rebels. >> there are many countries that can do that. that's not a unique capability for the united states, and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> reporter: but gates clearly thinks somebody, perhaps an arab country, should. >> the opposition needs as much as anything right now is some training, some command and control, and some organization. it's a pretty-- it's pretty much a pickup ballgame at this point. >> reporter: testifying on the day nato took command of the operation, gates said the u.s. would start pullin
and tsunami, a desperate search for food, water and missing loved ones. and on the u.s. west coast, fears of radiation results in a run on potassium iodide. but is there really cause for concern? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan is dealing tonight with the aftermath of one catastrophe while trying to prevent another. we'll have much more about the earthquake and tsunami in a moment. the official death toll is nearly 3,400. but first, the nuclear crisis. radiation continues to leak from damaged nuclear reactors in fukushima, 140 miles north of tokyo. an estimated 50 workers are still trying desperately to cool them to prevent a meltdown. in the meantime, 70,000 people have been evacuated from an area within 12 miles of the dai-ichi plant and 140,000 more living within 120 miles of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on ame
traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sorry. we're probably going to be getting out of fukushima prefecture either late tonight or early tomorr
another. >> reporter: but republicans say a spike in u.s. jihadist terror plots justify their focus. between may of 2009 and november, 2010, arrests were made for 22 such plots-- more than in the previous seven years combined. >> there is that small element in the community that's radicalizing. >> reporter: poisoning the atmosphere was king's own past assertion-- that most u.s. mosques are run by radicals. >> cleaning a dirty kitchen you can't clean it with dirty water. >> reporter: king is from long island and his relations with muslim leaders there deteriorated after 9/11. >> we have some serious concerns because congressman king has been a muslim barber. >> reporter: keith ellison, one of two muslim congressmen, broke down as he recalled a paramedic killed on 9/11 who was later smeared because of his muslim faith. >> his life should not be identify as just a member of the ethnic group or just a member of a religion. >> reporter: despite the tension, king called this his happiest day. >> i challenge anyone to find anything that was improper about today's hearing. >> reporter: in f
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)